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April 2018

Kaffeestunde

April 11 @ 2:00 pm - 3:00 pm
|Recurring Event (See all)

An event every week that begins at 2:00pm on Wednesday, repeating until May 2, 2018

A weekly casual meeting in the Dey Hall German department. Anyone wishing to practice speaking German is welcome! Kaffeestunde is held every Wednesday from 2:00 to 3:00pm in the German department Reading Room: Dey 413. Come join us! For more information, contact Nathan Drapela. View poster here.

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Works in Progress Forum

April 11 @ 7:30 pm - 8:30 pm
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One event on October 11, 2017 at 7:30pm

One event on November 15, 2017 at 7:30pm

One event on February 21, 2018 at 7:30pm

One event on March 5, 2018 at 7:30pm

One event on April 11, 2018 at 7:30pm

Speaker: Stefani Engelstein: " The East Within Muslims, Jews and Race in the Long Nineteenth Century" Wednesday, September 13, 2017 - 7:30pm Speaker: Kyung L. Gagum - " The Intertextuality in Fritz Lang's Metropolis and the Japanese Animation Metropolis "Century" Wednesday, October 11, 2017 - 7:30pm Speaker: Christina Weiler - " Johann Gottfried Herder and Metaphors of Environmental Empathy" Wednesday, November 15, 2017 - 7:30pm Speaker: Eric Downing - " Walter Benjamin: Child Reading" Wednesday, February 21, 2018 - 7:30pm Speaker: Priscilla Layne - "Wenn eine Eisbärin spräche, könnten wir verstehen?: Animals, Fantasy, Race and Gender in Intercultural Writing" Monday, March 5, 2018 - 7:30pm Speaker: Christoph Schaub - " Making Proletarian Worlds: Internationalist World Literature and Montage Aesthetics in the Republic" Wednesday, April 11, 2018 - 7:30pm

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Ivan Vasilievich Changes Profession

April 12 @ 6:00 pm - 8:00 pm

A film screening presented by GSLL and Slavic Club. View poster here.

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Попойка

April 13 @ 3:30 pm - 4:30 pm
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An event every week that begins at 3:30pm on Friday, repeating until May 4, 2018

A weekly casual meeting in room 413 of Dey Hall. All people wishing to practice speaking Russian are welcome! Попойка is held every Friday from 3:30 until 4:30pm. Refreshments are provided. Come join us! For more information, contact Natasha Chernysheva. View the poster here.

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German Club Conversation Hour

April 13 @ 5:00 pm - 6:00 pm
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An event every week that begins at 5:00pm on Friday, repeating until May 4, 2018

Conversation Hour: Fridays at 5:00pm at Linda’s Bar & Grill except on the first Friday of every month, when it will be held at TRU Deli & Wine Bar. Look for the German flag!

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Religion as “Agent of Change”: Jewish and other Responses to Modernity in Germany, 1780-1860

April 15 @ 5:00 pm - 7:00 pm

SIMONE LÄSSIG   | German Historical Institute (GHI) Washington D.C The presentation explores the ambivalent role of Judaism and religiosity during the Sattelzeit, when German Jewry was confronted with deep reaching, sometimes threatening social change. The presentation sheds new light on Jewish coping strategies and the transformation of a socio-cultural system shaped by religious practices and knowledge orders in response to modernity. It will show how a new group of Jewish “movers and shakers” used religion and tradition to translate innovation and to make change socially relevant. Focusing on lived experience in communities beyond the centers of the reform movement, the presentation offers a fresh perspective of this astonishing transformation. Simone Lässig is the director of the German Historical Institute in Washington, D.C. and professor of modern History at the University of Braunschweig. Her research has cut across the fields of German history, Jewish history, and the history of knowledge. She is currently working on two projects: a reconsideration of family and kinship in the modern era (1800-2000) through the lens of a multi-generation family biography and a book, provisionally entitled “Coping with Disruptive Change: Jews, Middle Class Culture, and Social Transformation in early 19th Century Germany.” Moderation: KAREN HAGEMANN   |  UNC Chapel Hill, Department of History In cooperation with the UNC Center for European Studies and the Carolina Center for Jewish Studies

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Beginning German Group

April 16 @ 5:30 pm - 6:30 pm
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An event every week that begins at 5:30pm on Monday, repeating until May 2, 2018

The UNC German Club is now hosting Beginning German Group. This is in addition to our regular Friday conversation hours and is geared towards those just beginning to learn German who would benefit from having a more learning geared experience.No German experience is necessary. It will take place on Mondays at 5:30 in the 4th Floor Dey Reading Room. The meetings are intended to deal more with conversational German, though what is actually discussed and learned will reflect the interests and skills of those who attend regularly.

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The Use and Abuse of Historical Memory in Southeast Europe: An Interdisciplinary Dialogue

April 16 @ 5:30 pm - 7:00 pm

Societies across Southeast Europe are locked in symbolic wars over the past. Politicians, intellectuals, and opinion makers tap into the past to construct hierarchies, delineate identities, and chart a vision of the future. The Yugoslav wars in the 1990s, the divisive legacy of communism, and the traumas of World War II, including occupation, collaboration, resistance, and even the Holocaust continue to be a disputed terrain. At the same time, critical scholarship is engaged in a project to empower dissonant voices and memories “from below” which challenge dominant grand narratives focused on nation, victimhood, and historical grievances. Anthropologist Dr. Sarah Wagner (George Washington University) and political scientist Dr. Jelena Subotić (Georgia State University) will explore how remembering and commemorating the past affect the social fabric and politics in present-day Balkans. The conversation will be moderated by Dr. Dimitar Bechev (UNC Chapel Hill). Sarah Wagner is an associate professor of anthropology at George Washington University. Her research has explored connections between the destructive and creative forces of war, focusing primarily on the identification of missing persons in the aftermath of the Srebrenica genocide. She is the author of To Know Where He Lies: DNA Technology and the Search for Srebrenica’s Missing (California UP, 2008) and co-author of Srebrenica in the Aftermath of Genocide(Cambridge UP, 2014). In 2017 she received a Guggenheim Fellowship and an NEH Public Scholar award to complete her current monograph. Jelena Subotić is a professor of political science at Georgia State University. She is the author of Hijacked Justice: Dealing with the Past in the Balkans (Cornell UP, 2009), which examines the contested way in which international norms of transitional justice were appropriated by domestic political elites in the Western Balkans. Her research has appeared in a number of academic…

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Visegrad Talk: “Who Belongs?”: Contesting Citizenship in Central Europe

April 17 @ 5:30 pm - 7:00 pm

The migrant crisis in 2015 has caught most European countries unprepared and solicited diverse responses from the “old” and “new” Europe. Central European countries responded with almost hysterical fear and rejection of the possibility to settle some of the incoming refugees on their territory. This reaction has historical and cultural roots upon which the very conception of citizenship is defined and interpreted. It is connected to an exclusivist idea of a state-forming nation in this region, which already perceives the “old” ethnic minorities as symbolically less equal citizens to the ethnic Slovaks, Hungarians, or Poles. Any “Other” is relegated to a more distant periphery of perceived belonging. This tendency is underscored by the relation of the Central European regimes to their own past — lack of accountability and responsibility for the fascist and communist past and tradition of “exporting” guilt West and East — so much so that the region has earned a label of a “memory hole of Europe.” This talk will examine how ideas about who belongs and perceived historical grievances impact the way citizenship policies are designed and implemented today. Dagmar Kusá is an assistant professor at the Bratislava International School of Liberal Arts (BISLA). She is the Vice President of the Helsinki Committee for Human Rights in Slovakia. Her primary academic interests include the political use of collective memory, citizenship and minorities, and manifestations of cultural trauma in public discourse. Her current research focuses on the quality of democracy in countries transitioning from totalitarian or authoritarian regimes and its relation to the institutional choices of the past, particularly in the context of South African and Central European history.   This talk is made possible by a University Studies Grant from the International Visegrad Fund.

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Kaffeestunde

April 18 @ 2:00 pm - 3:00 pm
|Recurring Event (See all)

An event every week that begins at 2:00pm on Wednesday, repeating until May 2, 2018

A weekly casual meeting in the Dey Hall German department. Anyone wishing to practice speaking German is welcome! Kaffeestunde is held every Wednesday from 2:00 to 3:00pm in the German department Reading Room: Dey 413. Come join us! For more information, contact Nathan Drapela. View poster here.

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