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What is GSLL offering this semester?

Every semester GSLL offers undergraduate students:

  • First-Year Seminars;
  • Beginning, Intermediate, and Advanced Language Courses;
  • English-Language Seminars and Lectures on Language, Linguistics, Literature, Film, Philosophy, and Culture;
  • Language, Linguistics, Literature, Film, Philosophy, and Culture Seminars taught in the Target Language;
  • Individual Seminars on Independent Readings;
  • Honors Thesis Mentoring.

GSLL also offers every semester for graduate students German- and English-language courses in Literature, Linguistics, Theory, Film & Media Studies.

The following catalogue of current courses is organized according to language and level.

In the event you have questions, contact the director of undergraduate or graduate studies.

 

Fall 2022 Course Descriptions

Note: Instructional Modes may potentially be subject to change.

 

Courses for First-Year Students 

GSLL 56. First-Year Seminar: Germans, Jews, and the History of Anti-Semitism.  

This seminar offers first-year students an introduction to the German-Jewish experience and the history of antisemitism in Germany, from early modernity to the present day. Students in this seminar will learn to analyze a variety of texts (both literary and philosophical), musical works, and films in relation to the history of Jews in German-speaking countries and will be able to apply their knowledge to their analysis of present-day manifestations of antisemitism and xenophobia in Germany. The course has no prerequisites and presumes no prior knowledge of the subject matter. 

Readings and discussions in English.
Making Connections Gen Ed: Historical Analysis, Communication Intensive, North Atlantic World.
Same as: JWST 56. 

Nester. TR 12:30 PM – 01:45 PM    

GSLL 80. First-Year Seminar: Animals in Russian Literature 

This seminar explores the “question of the animal” in the works of major Russian writers (Gogol, Dostoevsky, Tolstoy, Turgenev, Chekhov) and introduces students to the main theoretical texts on the animal/human relationship (Nietzsche, Levinas, Derrida, Irigaray). Among the topics to be discussed are the animal as the other, animal, and human natures, dominance and submission, ethics of the human/animal relations, and the theme of “talking” animals. 

Readings and discussions in English.
Making Connections Gen Ed: Literary Arts, Beyond the North Atlantic World. 

IDEAs in Action Gen Ed: Aesthetic & Interpretive Analysis, Engagement with the Human Past. 

Lapushin. TR 12:30 PM – 01:45 PM 

IDST 190.012. Humans and the Cosmos 

This course is an interdisciplinary introduction to some of the most essential and exciting debates about humanity’s relationship to the universe. We explore such topics as the beginning of existence, the nature of time, contact with the supernatural world, and predictions about the end of all things: from the perspective of philosophy, physics, history, and related disciplines.
Worthen, Trop, Drut. TR 03:30 PM – 04:45 PM. 

 

Beginning, Intermediate, and Advanced Language Courses 

BCS 401. Elementary Bosnian-Croatian-Serbian Language I.  

This course is designed for new learners and heritage speakers of BCS who wish to develop elementary proficiency in four major language competencies: listening, speaking, reading, and writing. It introduces key linguistic and sociocultural aspects of contemporary BCS and will be an asset to students looking to reconnect with their family heritage, visit the region or simply get acquainted with this major Slavic language and its history. 

Dzumhur. TR 09:30 AM – 10:45 AM 

 

BCS 403. Intermediate Bosnian-Croatian-Serbian Language I.  

The second year of BCS instruction will continue to build grammar and communication skills for intermediate low and heritage speakers. We will revisit and review many of the grammar concepts from the previous year while gradually incorporating new vocabulary and developing cultural competencies through a variety of authentic sources in the target language (comics, films, music, and others).  

Prerequisite, BCS 402; permission of the instructor for students lacking the prerequisite.
Dzumhur. TR 03:30 PM – 04:45 PM 

DTCH 402. Elementary Dutch.  

Wees gezellig en leer Nederlands!  

Did you know that UNC is one of only a few universities in the US where you can learn Dutch?  

DTCH 402 is the place to start.  

Doe je mee?  

Completion of DTCH 402 fulfills level 2 of a foreign language.
Thornton. MWF 02:30 PM – 03:20 PM 

GERM 101. Elementary German I. 

Develops the four language skills (speaking, listening, reading, writing) in a cultural context. In addition to mastering basic vocabulary and grammar, students will communicate in German about everyday topics.
001: Staff. MW 09:05 AM – 09:55 AM; TR 09:00 AM – 09:50 AM 

002: Staff. MW 10:10 AM – 11:00 AM; TR 10:00 AM – 10:50 AM 

004: Staff. MW 11:15 AM – 12:05 PM; TR 11:05 AM – 11:55 AM 

005: Staff. MW 12:20 PM – 01:10 PM; TR 12:30 PM – 01:20PM 

006: Staff. MW 01:25 PM – 02:15 PM; TR 1:30 PM – 02:20 PM 

 

GERM 102. Elementary German II. 

This continuation of GERM 101 emphasizes speaking, listening, reading, writing in a cultural context. Students enhance their basic vocabulary and grammar and will regularly communicate in German about everyday topics.  

Prerequisite, GERM 101; permission of the instructor for students lacking the prerequisite.
001: Staff. MW 10:10 AM – 11:00 AM; TR 10:00 AM – 10:50 AM 

002: Staff. MW 11:15 AM – 12:05 PM; TR 11:05 AM – 11:55 AM 

003: Staff. MW 12:20 PM – 01:10 PM; TR 12:30 PM – 01:20 PM 

 

GERM 203. Intermediate German I.  

Students acquire necessary materials and opportunities to develop further their language skills in a cultural context. They review and expand upon the basic grammar covered in beginning German.  

Prerequisite, GERM 102; permission of the instructor for students lacking the prerequisite.
001: Staff. MWF 10:10 AM – 11:00 AM  

002: Staff. MWF 11:15 AM – 12:05 PM 

003: Staff. MWF 12:20 PM – 01:10 PM 

005: Staff. MWF 01:25 PM – 02:15 PM 

 

GERM 204. Intermediate German II.  

Emphasizes further development of the four language skills (speaking, reading, writing, listening) within a cultural context. Discussions focus on modern Germany, Austria, and Switzerland in literature and film.  

Prerequisite, GERM 203; permission of the instructor for students lacking the prerequisite.
001: Staff. MWF 10:10 AM – 11:00 AM 

002: Staff. MWF 01:25 PM – 02:15 PM 

GERM 301. Advanced Applied German: Life, Work, Fun.  

Introduction to present-day German-speaking societies with an emphasis on practical contexts of everyday life (business, media, culture). The course initiates a sustained reflection on class, gender, race, and political economy and prepares students for studying and interning in German-speaking Europe. Further goals include improvement of pronunciation and the mastery of grammar.
Prerequisite, GERM 204; permission of the instructor for students lacking the prerequisite.
Making Connections Gen Ed: Communication Intensive, North Atlantic World. 

IDEAs in Action Gen Ed: Ways of Knowing. 

Staff. TR 09:30 AM – 10:45 PM 

GERM 302. Advanced Communication in German: Media, Arts, Culture.  

Emphasis is on advanced communication and writing based on shorter readings from contemporary life and culture in German-speaking societies. The readings provide subject matter for in-class discussion and regular written compositions that explore a variety of practical genres (report, article, essay). 

Prerequisite, GERM 204; permission of the instructor for students lacking the prerequisite. 

Making Connections Gen Ed: Social Sciences, Communication Intensive. North American World.  

IDEAs in Action Gen Ed: Global Understanding & Engagement, Power, Difference, & Inequality. 

Layne. MWF 9:05 AM – 9:55 AM 

GERM 304. Business German.  

An introduction to the language and culture of German business, commerce, and industry. Special emphasis is given to the acquisition of advanced business-related language skills.
Prerequisite, GERM 204; permission of the instructor for students lacking the prerequisite.
Making Connections Gen Ed: North Atlantic World. 

Rockelmann. MW 03:35 PM -04:50 PM 

PLSH 401. Elementary Polish I.  

Proficiency-based instruction at the elementary level that develops the four language skills (speaking, listening, reading, writing). In addition to mastering basic vocabulary and grammar, students will communicate in Polish about everyday topics.
Staff. MWF 09:05 AM – 09:55 AM 

PLSH 403. Intermediate Polish I.  

Continuation of the proficiency-based instruction begun in elementary Polish.
Prerequisite, PLSH 402; permission of the instructor for students lacking the prerequisite.
Staff. MWF 10:10 AM – 11:00 AM 

RUSS 101. Basic Russian I. 

Essential basics of Russian for everyday conversations. Lays foundation for development of four language skills (speaking, writing, listening, and reading) indispensable for communication on everyday topics in a variety of contexts. Fosters interaction through acquisition of essential communicative and conversational strategies. Introduces learners to structure of contemporary standard Russian through culturally relevant materials.
001: McGarry. MWF 11:15 AM – 12:05 PM; R 11:05 AM – 11:55 AM 

002: McGarry. MWF 01:25 PM – 02:15 PM; R 01:30 PM – 02:20 PM 

003: Doubleday. MWF 01:25 PM – 02:15 PM; R 01:30 PM – 02:20 PM 

004: McGarry. MWF 02:30 PM – 03:20 PM; R 02:30-03:20 PM 

 

RUSS 203. Intermediate Russian Communication I.  

Transitional skills for fluent speaking, writing, listening, and reading for intermediate learners. Furthers learners’ competency for communication on everyday topics. Prepares learners for communication on subjects beyond their immediate needs. Expands interactive skillset necessary to maintain conversations and present individual opinions using complex structures. Employs adapted and non-adapted learning materials to promote mastery of contemporary standard Russian.
Prerequisite, RUSS 102; permission of the instructor for students lacking the prerequisite.
001: Magomedova. MWF 10:10 AM – 11:00 AM
002: Magomedova. MWF 11:15 AM – 12:05 PM 

003: Ginocchio. MWF 1:25 PM – 2:15 PM 

RUSS 409. Intermediate-to-Advanced Russian Communication, Conversation, and Composition in Context I.  

Intermediate-to-advanced communication, conversation, composition, phonetics, and grammar in contemporary cultural context. Meets the needs of learners looking to expand their practical knowledge of contemporary standard Russian in the context of present-day culture, while developing active applied skills pertaining to comprehension, production of, and communication in Russian.
Prerequisite, RUSS 204; permission of the instructor for students lacking the prerequisite.
Making Connections Gen Ed: Beyond the North Atlantic World. 

001: Chernysheva. MWF 01:25 PM – 02:15 PM 

003: Chernysheva. MWF 02:30 PM – 03:20 PM 

RUSS 411. Advanced Communication, Conversation, and Composition in Contemporary Standard Russian I.  

Develops and maintains advanced skills for speaking, writing, listening, and reading in contemporary standard Russian in a variety of communicative situations. Assists advanced learners in solving a wide range of communicative tasks with the aid of unadopted authentic cultural materials.
Prerequisite, RUSS 410; permission of the instructor for students lacking the prerequisite. 

Magomedova MWF 02:30 PM – 03:20 PM 

RUSS 515. Advanced Russian Communication, Composition and Grammar in the Professions I.  

Provides advanced learners with opportunities to develop linguo-cultural skills necessary to practice their profession in Russian. While engaged in academic discourse in contemporary standard Russian, learners research topics in their academic majors, prepare and give presentations and lead discussions focusing on their areas of professional competence. In addition to student-centered segments, the course comprises instructor-led discussions of current affairs and academic subjects. Readings, viewing materials, and discussions in Russian. 

Prerequisites, RUSS 412, or permission of the instructor for students lacking the prerequisite. 

Making Connections Gen Ed: Beyond the North Atlantic World, Experiential Education-Mentored Research. 

IDEAs in Action Gen Ed: Communication Beyond Carolina, Research & Discovery. 

Chernysheva. MW 03:35 PM – 04:50 PM                                                     

 

 

Undergraduate English-Language Seminars & Lectures 

 GERM 216. The Viking Age.  

This is a lecture and discussion course that deals with culture, mythology, exploration, and projection of power in northern Europe during the Viking Age (ca. 750-1066 CE). Our source material is the literature of medieval Iceland (ca. 1120–1400), which is itself a product of Norse exploration and colonization. We shall seek to extrapolate from this literature—supplemented by historical information—a composite picture of cultures, values, and societies of the Atlantic North during the Viking Age. 

Readings and discussions in English.
Making Connections Gen Ed: Historical Analysis, North Atlantic World, World Before 1750. 

Roberge. TR 12:30 PM – 01:45 PM 

GSLL 280. The Dialectic of Whiteness and Blackness in Atlantic Cultures.  

In this class we will trace the invention of race, racism, and discourses of cultural inferiority/superiority throughout Western culture. What historical events created the necessity for racist thinking? How did colonialism and transatlantic migration change Atlantic cultures? Why did Black culture become fashionable? What happened to our aspirations for a “post-racial” society?  

Readings and course descriptions in English.
Making Connections Gen Ed: Global Issues, North Atlantic World. 

IDEAs in Action Gen Ed: Ways of Knowing, Ethical & Civic Values 

Layne. MW 11:15 AM – 12:05 PM 

Recitation Required. 

601: Staff. F 10:10 AM – 11:00 AM 

602: Staff. F 11:15 AM – 12:05 PM  

GSLL 287. Into the Streets: 1968 and Dissent in Central Europe.  

Protest movements around the world in 1968 are often remembered as one “planetary event.” In Western Europe, protesters demanded revolution, while in East and Central Europe, protesters living under socialism demanded reform. This course explores dissent, counterculture, and social movements in and beyond Central Europe through the stories of one eventful year. Using film and fiction from both sides of the Iron Curtain, we will investigate the impact of the Central European ’68(s) worldwide.  

Films with English subtitles; readings and discussions in English.
Making Connections Gen Ed: Literary Arts, Beyond the North Atlantic World, Experiential Education-Mentored Research. 

Rose. TR 03:30 PM – 04:45 PM 

 

 

Undergraduate Seminars Taught in the Target Language 

GERM 303. German Literature and Culture.  

An overview of German literature, culture, and politics, highlighting works from various periods. Students will engage in discussions about German literature and will be encouraged to think and re-think the significance of literary production in different media.  

Readings, discussions, and essays in German.  

Pre- or corequisite, GERM 301 or 302; permission of the instructor for students lacking the prerequisite.
Making Connections Gen Ed: Literary Arts, Communication Intensive, North Atlantic World. 

IDEAs in Action Gen Ed: Aesthetic & Interpretive Analysis. 

Prica. TR 11:00 PM – 12:15 PM 

GERM 349. Vienna-Munich-Berlin: Revolutions in German Art c. 1900.  

Turn-of-the-century Berlin, Munich and Vienna experienced an explosion of creative energies that left their mark on the music, painting, literature, and film of the time. Students enrolled in this course will encounter this era’s aesthetic movements including naturalism, decadence, symbolism, Jugendstil, and expressionism and investigate them as the ground for battles between classes and generations, morality and sexual revolution, bohemianism and decadence, psychology, militarism, as well as abstraction and the search for feeling. 

Readings and lectures in German.
Prerequisite, GERM 303; permission of the instructor for students lacking the prerequisite.
Making Connections Gen Ed: Literary Arts, North Atlantic World. 

Nester. TR 03:30 PM – 04:45 PM                                  

GSLL 489. GSLL Across the Curriculum (LAC):  Russia Today: Headlines and Beyond. 

This one-credit hour class aims to develop and facilitate conversational skills in Russian language in the context of the current political, economic, and cultural climate. Knowledge of Russian at the upper-intermediate level required. Fall 2022 will focus on current events in and around Russia, with significant attention paid to Russia’s invasion of Ukraine and its consequences.  

Readings and class discussion in Russian.  

Prerequisite, RUSS 204; permission of instructor for students lacking the prerequisite.  

Ginocchio. W 4:40-5:30* 

*Interested students with a schedule conflict should contact the instructor. The meeting time may be adjusted before the start of the semester. 

 

 

Dual-Level Seminars Taught in English 

GSLL 481. Grand Hotels and Empty Fields: Inventing Central Europe through Culture.  

Central Europe is a region with shifting borders, diverse languages, mobile populations, and intricate relationships with its neighbors to both East and West. This course explores works of film and fiction set in invented Central European countries – from the mist-shrouded mountains of Wes Anderson’s Zubrowka to strange but familiar realms conceived by Joseph Roth and Ursula K. Le Guin. We will explore culture’s role in shaping dynamics between East and West and within East Central Europe, with special focus on Poland and Ukraine. In our exploration of cultural studies methods, we will discuss and debate how various critical approaches may (or may not) apply to the Central European context.  

Films with English subtitles; readings and discussions in English.
Making Connections Gen Ed: Literary Arts, Beyond the North Atlantic World, Experiential Education-Mentored Research. 

Rose. TR 12:30 PM – 01:45 PM 

RUSS 465. Chekhov.  

Study of major works of Chekhov and survey of contemporary authors and literary trends relevant to his creative career.  

Taught in English; some readings in Russian for qualified students.
Making Connections Gen Ed: Literary Arts, Beyond the North Atlantic World. 

IDEAs in Action Gen Ed: Aesthetic & Interpretive Analysis. 

Lapushin. TR 03:30 PM – 04:45 PM 

 

 

Carolina-Duke Graduate Level Courses 

GERM 700. Foreign Language Pedagogy: Theories and Practice.  

German 700 provides students with foundational knowledge for teaching German within a collegiate U.S. educational context. Throughout the course, students will have the opportunity to engage theoretical knowledge pertaining to language learning, pedagogy, and curriculum with issues from the practical context of the language classroom, e.g., by conducting guided classroom observations, developing extended lesson plans, reflecting on their teaching and students’ learning, and creating a teaching philosophy. 

Topics covered in the seminar include: Teaching languages in U.S. higher education, language and language learning theories, language teaching methods and approaches (e.g., communicative language teaching, task- and content-based instruction, literacy approaches), supporting different modalities (writing, speaking, listening, writing), teaching for intercultural understanding, the role of curriculum, and professional development and reflective teaching. 

Readings and class discussions in German and English 

Weiler, Henry. M 04:40 PM – 07:10 PM. UNC and Duke Campuses     

GERMAN 715. Foundations in German Studies II, 1750 to 1900. 

Foundation in German Studies II offers a survey of literary, cultural, intellectual, and political developments in German-speaking lands between the years of 1750-1900. Our goal is to cultivate an understanding of literary and cultural history by paying particular attention to periods, movements, genres, ideologies, socio-economic developments, and philosophical ideas. The syllabus will include authors such as Lessing, Kant, Herder, Goethe, Schiller, Schlegel, Günderrode, Kleist, Heine, Büchner, Droste-Hülshoff, Marx, and Fontane.  

Readings will be in German, discussions in English. 

Norberg. F 10:15 AM – 12:45 PM. Duke Campus                                

GERM 860. The Aesthetics of Philosophies of Nature.  

Aesthetic theories in the eighteenth century are obsessed with nature: is art an imitation of nature—and if so, of a natural “order” and what is this natural order? Is there a difference between natural beauty and artistic beauty—and what is the relation of physis to techne? How do aesthetic paradigms manifest themselves in nature or in judgments about nature, e.g., in the beautiful and the sublime? Endless aesthetic investigations have centered around precisely such questions. This seminar will invert this line of inquiry. Specifically, it will ask the question: are philosophies of nature also, in some way, obsessed with art? And are they perhaps most productively and provocatively aesthetic—exploring epistemic, semiotic, or imaginative paradigms with a high potential of transference to aesthetic contexts—when they turn to nature as imagined outside human practices or irreducible to human intelligibility? Would it be possible to develop aesthetic theories or speculative aesthetics as consequences of such philosophies of nature, and what would they look like? The primary focus for this line of inquiry will be Schelling’s Naturphilosophie and poetic experiments with Naturphilosophie (in Novalis, Günderrode, Goethe, Hoffmann, Balzac), as well as some philosophies of nature before Schelling that harbor speculative aesthetics of this sort (Bruno, Leibniz, Theosophie [Jakob Böhme and Friedrich Christoph Oetinger], Schiller, and Hemsterhuis). 

Readings and class discussion in German and English.
Trop. W 04:40 PM – 07:10 PM. UNC Campus 

GERM 865. The Eighties  

After the fall of the Berlin Wall, literary critics were quick to dismiss the eighties.  

Compared to the new freedoms enjoyed in reunified Germany, the eighties were boring & uniform, shallow & unimaginative, devoid of experience & talent. Scholars were quick to call the decade transitional, somewhere between late modernism & postmodernism. Today, neither position does justice to the rich body of literature of the eighties.  

This seminar seeks to re-situate canonical (e.g., Grass, Hein, Jelinek, Müller, Ransmayr, Süskind, Strauβ, Wolf) and marginal literary works (e.g., Anderson, Glasser, Goetz, Goldt, Meinecke, Morshäuser, Shernikau) from both East and West Germany into the larger cultural contexts of popular music, painting, film, cultural theory, and philosophy. 

Of utmost concern is what Raymond Williams calls “structure of feeling”: 

What did the eighties feel like?  

How did structures of feeling morph over the decade?  

How did poetry, theater, and prose—in dialogue with other cultural texts—reflect and contest dominant affective structures? 

Readings in German, class discussions in German and English.
Langston. T 04:40 PM – 07:10 PM. UNC Campus