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September 2017

Kaffeestunde

September 20 @ 2:00 pm - 3:00 pm
|Recurring Event (See all)

An event every week that begins at 2:00pm on Wednesday, repeating until May 2, 2018

A weekly casual meeting in the Dey Hall German department. Anyone wishing to practice speaking German is welcome! Kaffeestunde is held every Wednesday from 2:00 to 3:00pm in the German department Reading Room: Dey 413. Come join us! For more information, contact Nathan Drapela. View poster here.

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Stonewall Never Happened: Conceptualizing Queer History and Rights in Russia and Eastern Europe

September 20 @ 5:00 pm - 7:00 pm

For the LGBTQ+ community in Eastern Europe and the former Soviet Union, 1989 held out the promise of new freedoms and opportunities. As communist regimes collapsed across Eastern Europe and the Soviet Union disintegrated, emerging liberal democratic regimes seemed to herald a bright future to LGBTQ individuals. 1989 was supposed to be for queer East Europeans what 1969 and Stonewall symbolized for LGBTQ Americans: a year of sexual liberation and political emancipation. This talk explores how LGBTQ rights in Eastern Europe and Russia have fared under democratic regimes since 1989, paying particular attention to the harsh repression of gay-pride parades, street protests, and political theatre. Marko Dumančić is Assistant Professor at Western Kentucky University. He works on a range of topics involving gender and sexual identity in the Soviet Union during the Cold War. His primary research examines changing conceptions of masculinity in post-Stalinist society of the 1950s and 1960. He is currently completing a monograph entitled The “New Men” of the Soviet Sixties: Masculinity in Film and Society after Stalin. His work has appeared in Journal of Cold War Studies, Cold War History, and Studies in Russian and Soviet Cinema. This talk is co-sponsored by the UNC Curriculum in Women’s and Gender Studies

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Filmabend

September 20 @ 7:30 pm - 9:00 pm

The German Club is having their first Filmabend (Movie Night) in Toy Lounge on Monday, September 25 at 7:30pm. They will be showing The People vs Fritz Bauer. View the poster here.

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Being A Father Is Not a Sissy Business: The Cult of Soviet Fatherhood After Stalin

September 21 @ 6:30 pm - 8:00 pm

This presentation examines a fundamental shift in how Soviet cinematographers reconfigured the notion and practice of fatherhood. After Stalin’s death in 1953, Soviet directors made active and emotive paternity central to what it means to be a Soviet man. This shift was significant because men’s identities were “domesticated” and their lives more firmly tied to the home rather than the public sphere. The “drama” of men’s lives—as depicted in post-Stalinist film—occurred around the family hearth rather than the blast furnace or the battlefield. While post-Stalinist films glorified fathers, they also inverted the generational dynamics since the fathers learned from their sons, rather than the other way around. In short, Soviet filmmakers presented their audiences with an ambitious cultural project in which men were required to be more nurturing, home-centered, and democratic in their dealings with their children. In the best of circumstances, this was a tall order. To request a copy of the paper, please email here. Marko Dumančić is Assistant Professor at Western Kentucky University. He works on a range of topics involving gender and sexual identity in the Soviet Union during the Cold War. His primary research examines changing conceptions of masculinity in post-Stalinist society of the 1950s and 1960. He is currently completing a monograph entitled The “New Men” of the Soviet Sixties: Masculinity in Film and Society after Stalin. His work has appeared in Journal of Cold War Studies, Cold War History, and Studies in Russian and Soviet Cinema. The Carolina Seminar: Russia and Its Emipres, East and West is co-sponsored by the Carolina Seminar Program, the UNC Department of History, and the Center for Slavic, Eurasian, and East European Studies. Please note that the participants will give an overview of…

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Попойка

September 22 @ 3:30 pm - 4:30 pm
|Recurring Event (See all)

An event every week that begins at 3:30pm on Friday, repeating until May 4, 2018

A weekly casual meeting in room 413 of Dey Hall. All people wishing to practice speaking Russian are welcome! Попойка is held every Friday from 3:30 until 4:30pm. Refreshments are provided. Come join us! For more information, contact Natasha Chernysheva. View the poster here.

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German Club Conversation Hour

September 22 @ 5:00 pm - 6:00 pm
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An event every week that begins at 5:00pm on Friday, repeating until May 4, 2018

Conversation Hour: Fridays at 5:00pm at Linda’s Bar & Grill except on the first Friday of every month, when it will be held at TRU Deli & Wine Bar. Look for the German flag!

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When, How, and Why Did Jews Become a “Minority”? Remapping Difference in Central Europe, 1815-1919

September 24 @ 5:00 pm - 7:00 pm

When, How, and Why Did Jews Become a "Minority"? Remapping Difference in Central Europe, 1815-1919 TILL VAN RAHDEN Université de Montréal, Department of History The conceptual couple of majority/minority is viewed as a harmless way of identifying an arithmetic relationship. The idea of a dichotomy between majority and (Jewish) minority as a short hand to describe relations between ethnic or religious groups, however, is recent. In fact, as the lecture will demonstrate, it did not exist before 1919 when in the wake of World War I the idea of democracy and the idea of the homogeneous nation-state triumphed simultaneously. Prior to 1919, languages of diversity invoked embedded concepts that referred to specific constellations of difference, such as colony or community, churches, nations, races, or tribes. The opposition of majority and minority introduced a level of abstraction into struggles over recognition. “Minority rights” for Jews and others became a miracle cure in such conflicts and seemed to offer a universal formula promising an efficacious remedy. Till van Rahden is the Canada Research Chair in German and European Studies, Université de Montréal, Department of History. His book, Jews and other Germans: Civil Society, Religious Diversity and Urban Politics in Breslau, 1860-1925 (2008), received the “Fraenkel Prize in Contemporary History”. He has co-edited Juden, Bürger, Deutsche: Zur Geschichte von Vielfalt und Differenz 1800-1933 (2001); Demokratie im Schatten der Gewalt: Geschichten des Privaten im deutschen Nachkrieg (2010); and Autorität: Krise, Konstruktion und Konjunktur (2016).

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Beginning German Group

September 25 @ 5:30 pm - 6:30 pm
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An event every week that begins at 5:30pm on Monday, repeating until May 2, 2018

The UNC German Club is now hosting Beginning German Group. This is in addition to our regular Friday conversation hours and is geared towards those just beginning to learn German who would benefit from having a more learning geared experience.No German experience is necessary. It will take place on Mondays at 5:30 in the 4th Floor Dey Reading Room. The meetings are intended to deal more with conversational German, though what is actually discussed and learned will reflect the interests and skills of those who attend regularly.

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Theory Reading Group – Agamben on Method

September 25 @ 7:30 pm - 8:30 pm
|Recurring Event (See all)

An event every month that begins at 7:30pm on day Last of the month, repeating until November 28, 2017

The GSLL Theory Group will meet three times this semester to discuss the work of Italian philosopher Giorgio Agamben. Well known throughout the humanities for his 1995 book on power and bare life entitled Homo sacer, the reading group will instead engage Agamben’s more recent essays on literary method. The meetings and readings are as follows: September 25: “Theory of Signatures” (from: The Signature of All Things ) October 30: “The Fire and the Tale,” “Mysterium Burocraticum,” & “Parable and Kingdom” (from: The Fire and the Tale ) November 27: “On the Difficulty of Reading,” “From the Book to the Screen,” & “Opus Alchymicum” (from: The Fire and the Tale ) Accss to the readings is available online (password = Agamben) via Hightail. The GSLL Theory Reading Group is an informal, relaxed setting for reading and discussing theoretical texts of utility for the study of literature, film, and culture. Participation in the Reading Group is open to any and all graduate students and faculty; previous participation is not required to attend. Questions about the Reading Group can be directed to Professors Gabriel Trop, Aleksandra Prica or Richard Langston

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Quo Vadis Europe? The German Elections 2017 and their Significance for the Future of the EU

September 26 @ 5:30 pm - 7:00 pm

On September 24, 2017, German voters are electing a new parliament. Will Chancellor Angela Merkel, who is running for the fourth time, continue to head a coalition government, or will a center left coalition under the leadership of the social democrats win enough votes to govern? Will the right-wing party AfD enter national parliament? And if so, what does this mean for the future of European politics? The outcome of the Dutch and French elections in spring 2017 reduced anxieties about a right-wing shift in major European capitals, yet our understanding of European affairs and the solutions for potential crises remain more intangible. With Brexit negotiations on a rocky path and rising tensions in transatlantic relations, the future of Europe will depend on the preferences and politics of the new German government. The presentation will address the outcome of the 2017 elections and the future direction of Germany’s role in Europe. Christiane Lemke is a professor of political science at Leibniz University Hannover, Germany. She received her Ph.D. from the Free University in Berlin and went on to earn her Habilitation venia legendi in Political Science from the same institution. She has been Visiting Krupp Chair at Harvard University, DAAD Professor at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and Distinguished Visiting Professor at Suffolk University. She served as Leibniz University Hannover's director of the Jean Monnet European Center of Excellence from 2007-2011. In addition, while on leave from Leibniz University Hannover from 2006 to 2007, she served as Director of State Parliament in Lower Saxony, Germany. From 2010-2014 she was the holder of the Max Weber Chair in German and European Studies at NYU. Professor Lemke’s academic areas of expertise include: European Politics,…

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